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Benefits of Physical Fitness for Special Needs Children

Sports, especially fundamental and movement education-based sports such as gymnastics, provide tremendous benefits for children with special needs. Physical education programs can considerably improve the lifestyle of a disabled child and are highly recommended. These programs may help control obesity, promote activeness, increase a child's self-image and social skills, and increase motivation. The physical activity along with support, rewards, and interaction can, among other benefits, be very helpful to these children and their families.

Physical Improvements
Children suffering from cognitive disabilities are most likely going to suffer from physical impairments as well. These children have substantial problems with motor skills in areas such as hopping, skipping, and jumping. Involvement in gymnastics can help these individuals develop fundamental motor and physical fitness skills.

Sensory Integration
Many autistic individuals have sensory problems, which can range from mild to severe. These problems involve either hypersensitivity or hyposensitivity to stimulation. Sensory integration focuses primarily on three senses
vestibular (i.e., motion, balance), tactile (i.e., touch), and proprioception (e.g., joints, ligaments). Many techniques are used to stimulate these senses in order to normalize them.
Sensory integration activities allow a person with autism to improve responses to certain stimuli. A therapist often recommends certain activities to assist with sensory processing problems. Examples of activities that may improve sensory processing are group sports activity, gymnastics, swinging or creating a sensory room.

Physical Therapy
Often children with autism have limited gross and fine motor skills, so physical therapy can be helpful. May also include sensory integration; vestibular (i.e., motion, balance), tactile (i.e., touch), and proprioception (e.g., joints, ligaments) Many techniques are used to stimulate these senses in order to normalize them. Activities with gymnastics movement, balance and strength can be very helpful when introduced at an early age. Tulsa World Of Gymnastics is proud to offer special classes for both challenged children and young adults. We know from our years of experience that physical education programs can considerably improve the lifestyle of a disabled child. The physical activity along with support, rewards, and interaction can, among other benefits, be very helpful to these children and their families.

Special Needs


Fitness Classes and Personal Training
Children with disabilities face unique challenges, but in many instances they can still participate in physical activities. Fitwize 4 Kids understands the importance of developing fitness programs for kids with special needs. Your child will benefit from our specialized fitness equipment, which provides a safe routine and physical outlet as well as boosting self-esteem and confidence by building your child's physical fitness. Parents goals of increased strength, motor planning and motor coordination are achieved through patience and understanding. The implementation of physical activity for children with special needs has numerous benefits. Fitwize 4 Kids goal is to educate the young autism population.

The Benefits include:
  • Builds self-esteem
  • Improves social interaction
  • Improves focus and function of daily living skills
  • Weight loss
  • Reduction of anxiety
  • Have fun while getting fit
  • Allows for release of positive and or negative energy resulting in productive output.
Yoga
Fitwize 4 kids yoga can be a safe and fun way for your child with special needs to get additional help handling particular challenges. The physical, mental benefits of yoga have been proven to be helpful on many levels.

Yoga has been used in a therapeutic way for children who suffer from the following conditions:
  • Autism
  • Cerebral palsy
  • Developmental delays
  • Learning disabilities
  • Down syndrome
  • Attention Deficit Disorder
  • Problems with hearing or vision
One on One training available for children with special needs.

Fitness for Children With Special Needs
Children's Fitness: Helping Your Child Stay Active
These days it's probably more common to find a remote, keyboard or video game controller in the hands of a child at play than a ball, glove or earthworm. And because physical activity is so important during the formative years of children's lives, it's crucial to ensure they're getting the exercise they need. Use the Children's Fitness Web Guide to get insight into childhood exercise and tips for getting kids off the couch and into the yard.

Exercises for Kids
The amount of exercise a child requires is largely dependent upon age, and balance must be struck, because just as too little exercise can be unhealthy for a child, so can too much. Use the following sites for an overview of exercises for kids, and get advice on the optimum amount of exercise for your child and tips for safe exercise practices.

Insights for Exercises for Kids
  • If you're wondering whether your state has any physical fitness programs, check with your Department of Health. USA.gov has a complete list of state links to get you started.
  • The findingDulcinea Fitness Web Guide has additional fitness Web sites, with sections that focus on nutrition and exercise activities such as strength training and yoga.
  • If your child has any physical limitations, such as asthma or other disabilities, be sure to check with your child's doctor to find the type and amount of exercise that would be suitable for him or her.
Fun Fitness for Kids


Chances are you'll have better luck getting your child moving if there's an element of fun to the activity. Use the sites below to create a plan of fun fitness for kids. Figure out what types of activities are the best fit, get advice on motivating children and find team sports.

Insights for Fun Fitness for Kids
  • Children's gyms provide an opportunity for your child to interact with other kids, learn new skills and play on age-appropriate sports equipment.
  • Although the recommendation for 60 minutes of activity a day can seem overwhelming, remember that it doesn't have to be done all at once. According to the Weight-control Information Network, activities can be broken into five- and 10-minute blocks throughout the day.
Nutrition for Kids

Physical fitness is about more than just exercise—it's about good nutrition. In today's fast-food environment, eating a healthy diet isn't always easy. Visit the following Web sites for information on nutrition for kids.

Insights for Nutrition for Kids
  • It may not be easy for you to tell whether your child is overweight; a body mass index (BMI) calculator for kids can help. Before taking any additional steps, though, discuss the matter with your child's doctor.
  • Don't put your child on a diet "unless your health care provider tells you to. If children do not eat enough, they may not grow and learn as well as they should," according to the Weight-control Information Network.
  • Have a picky eater in your household? Don't despair. Experts say that children may need to be served a food at least 10 times before they will actually eat it.
Fitness for Children With Special Needs
Children with disabilities face unique challenges, but in many instances they can still participate in physical activities. Use the sites below to find fitness information for children with special needs, exercises, suggestions on adapting activities for your child with special needs and emotional support.

Insights for Fitness for Children With Special Needs
  • Check with a physician before starting any exercise routine with your child to be sure you're aware of any risks your child faces and to get familiar with proper safety precautions.
  • Having a hard time finding the information you need about exercise for someone with a physical disability? Try using the phrase "adaptive physical fitness" in your favorite search engine.
  • A 2005 documentary entitled "Murderball" introduced an international sport described as wheelchair rugby. The athletes push the boundaries of athletic competition, and the trailer alone inspires.